Common Q&A about Eye Classes and LASIK

Questions:

1. What lens designs do I need?

2. What lens materials should I choose?

3. What options can I add to the lenses of my glasses?

4. What is LASIK?

5. Am I a good candidate for LASIK and what procedure do I need?

6. What is the risk of Laser correction surgery?

7. What are floaters? How to deal with floaters?

 

Answers:

1. What lens designs do I need?

The following are the options of the lens designs. You can choose it base on your prescription, life style and personal preference:

  • Single Vision: This all-purpose len is available in all materials, and can be used for either distance or near vision correction.

  • Bifocals provide both far (driving) and near (reading map) correction in one lens.

  • Trifocals are basically progressive lenses with visible lines. The majority of the lens is for distance viewing, while the center portion is divided into intermediate and near viewing segments.

  • Progressives correct for far (driving a vehicle), intermediate (viewing the computer), and near (reading a map) all in one lens. Because there is no visible line, progressives have the appearance of single-vision lenses and are, therefore, the most cosmetically desirable multifocal.

  • Aspheric Design Lens offers less magnification or minification of the eyes, as well as in images viewed. Edge-to-edge visual clarity means that as the eyes move, vision will remain clear rather than ”blur out” when the viewer looks away from the center of the lens.

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2. What lens materials should I choose?

The following are the options of the lens material. You can choose it based on your prescription, life style and personal preference:

  • Plastic lenses are lighter than glass lenses, but it is easy to be scratched.

  • Glass lenses offer superior optics and the best scratch-resistance. However glass lenses are easy to be broken, so it is not safe.

  • Polycarbonate lenses are one of the high index lenses and have low specific gravity, so they are thinner and lighter. They provide good safety for eyewear because they are high impact resistant.

  • Trivex lenses have the feature of high impact resistant, lightweight and thin just like polycarbonate.

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3. What options can I add to the lenses of my glasses?

You can choose the following options of lenses base on your preference, life style and occupation needs:

  • Scratch-resistance coating: Recommended to protect lenses from everyday wear-and-tear.

  • UV protection coating: The sun’s UV rays pose potential hard to your eyes. UV protection on lenses accomplishes the same thing as sunscreen lotion on your skin-it shields your eyes from harmful UV rays.

  • Anti-reflective (AR) coating: AR coating provides maximum reduction of reflections, your lenses appear crystal clear and practically invisible, the wearer’s eyes are clearly vision behind the lenses, so AR lenses are cosmetically desirable. Also AR lenses help reduce eye fatigue in all situations, particularly while viewing computer screens and driving at night. AR lenses enhance vision by removing distracting reflections.

  • Photochromic Lenses: Sometimes called “comfort” lenses, photochromic lenses darken and lighten according to light exposure. If the wearer is in the sun, photochromics darken, if indoors, the lenses are light. Photochromic lenses are available in virtually all lens materials and lens designs.

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4. What is LASIK?

LASIK (Laser-Assisted-In-Situ Keratomileusis) is currently the most common type of laser vision correction procedure. It is an effective outpatient procedure that is suitable for low, moderate, and higher prescriptions. Although no medical procedure is perfect, the excimer laser allows for an unparalleled degree of precision and predictability. Each pulse of the laser can remove 39-millionths of an inch of tissue in 12-billionths of a second. This enables an experienced surgeon to achieve remarkable accuracy while maintaining excellent control throughout the procedure. However, the LASIK procedure requires a great deal of technical skill and training to perform properly, so choosing the proper surgeon is critical. The TLC network of surgeons has performed more than twice as many laser vision correction procedures than any other doctor network. So, regardless of what TLC center you choose, you will receive thorough care and have access to experienced, highly trained doctors.

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5. Am I a good candidate for LASIK and what procedure do I need?

The best way for you to determine this is with a thorough exam from your eye doctor. Appropriate candidates must be at least 18 years old, in good general health, and have good eye health with no diseases such as cataracts or glaucoma. Laser vision correction can treat a very broad range of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Through an initial consultation with your eye doctor, your doctor will confirm if you are a good candidate, explain the procedure, and answer your questions so that you can make an informed decision. He or she will explain what results you can reasonably expect by measuring your prescription and thoroughly examining your eyes.

What procedure you need is depending on many factors of your eyes (your prescription, thickness of your cornea, your age and so on). Your eye care professional is the best person to tell you.

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6. What is the risk of Laser correction surgery?

There are risks with the laser vision correction procedure. However, the chance of having a vision reducing complication has been documented in a number of clinical studies to be minimal. Remember, millions of people have had excellent results from laser vision correction.

Some potential complications include conditions such as dryness, complications in making the surgical flap, night glare, under or over-correction, and loss of best-corrected vision. At TLC Laser Eye Centers, these and other risks of the surgery are discussed fully with the patient prior to the procedure. Proper preoperative screening ensures that we proceed with the procedure only when it is medically advisable. As well, diligent post-operative care helps to identify and address any potential healing complications. Perhaps the best way to help prevent LASIK complications is to choose a surgeon who is experienced and respected in the community. This is one of the advantages of choosing TLC. TLC is careful to join only with respected and knowledgeable eye care professionals who value patient care above all things.

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7. What are floaters? How to deal with floaters?

Floaters are usually small, semi-transparent cloudy specks or particles that can appear as threadlike strands or cobwebs in various shapes and sizes within the vitreous. The vitreous is a clear, jelly-like fluid in the eye. While these objects appear to be in front of the eye, they are actually located within the eye and are noticed only when they cast a shadow on the retinal. The retina is the nerve layer at the back of the eye that senses light and allows the ability to see. The floaters will move as your eyes move and seem to dart away when you try to look at them directly. They can be often be seen when looking at a plain background, like a blank wall or blue sky

Floaters are often caused by small flecks or protein or other matter trapped during the formation of your eyes before birth. They can also result from deterioration of the vitreous fluid, due to aging; or from certain eye diseases or injuries. The vitreous can pull away from the back wall of the eye causing a posterior vitreous detachment leading to noticeable floater/s. Sometimes flashes or streaks of light may appear when the retinal is stimulated by this pulling action. These flashes are usually located in the peripheral vision and are very short in duration-last seconds.

Floaters are usually not harmful and rarely limit vision but can be an early indication of more serious eye problems. Occasionally, the retina can tear when the vitreous pulls away from the back wall of the eye. A torn retina is at risk for retinal detachment which can cause significant vision loss. An indication of torn retina or detachment is recurrent flashes. A dilated fundus examination is needed to evaluate if the floaters and/or flashes are harmful.

Floaters can occasionally get in the way of vision and be annoying. Since most cases are benign, these are no good surgical or medicinal options to remove them. With time, most floaters will fade as you adapt to them becoming less bothersome. However, new and sometimes persistent floaters should be evaluated.

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